Portraits by Helmut Newton

Posted By admin / April, 2, 2014 / 0 comments

Looking back at old classics, we are presenting a collection of portraits by Helmut Newton

He led the ultimate glamorous life. He lived in the Chateau Marmont in the winter months, to keep the cold and gloom at bay, befriending Billy Wilder, Dennis Hopper and Robert Evans. He was married to fellow photographer Alice Springs, quirkily named after a pin was placed in a map.

Newton arrived in Paris in a white Porsche, was hired immediately by French Vogue, commissioned by Playboy, had a heart attack at 50, and lived in Monte Carlo. Then in a final fling – or what Karl Lagerfeld poetically described as “his last picture, taken by himself”, he crashed his Cadillac on Sunset Boulevard aged 83, on January 23 2004.

  • After taking a model onto the streets during an early assignment at British Vogue, he was sternly told by the editor that “ladies, Helmut, do not lean against lampposts”
  • All Newton’s exhibitions were curated by his devoted wife; all books edited by her, including: White Women (1976), Sleepless Nights (1978), Big Nudes (1978), World Without Men (1984) and the massive Sumo (1999), which came out at 31 inches, 26 kilos, £625, and with its own coffee table (Brad Pitt bought several copies)
  •   Celebrating 51 years of marriage in 1999, their joint exhibition and book, Us And Them, included Alice’s photo of Newton wearing nothing but black stockings and his strangely tender portrait of her lying on a hospital bed, following a major operation, wearing a catheter and a huge metal zip running up her stomach.

 

Pirelli’s 2014 – 50th Anniversary Calendar by Helmut Newton

Posted By admin / March, 22, 2014 / 0 comments

THE latest Pirelli calendar will not star fashion’s current crop of supermodels as expected, rather the Italian tyre company – which launched its first risqué edition in 1964 as an marketing tool – will release an unpublished 1986 calendar shot by Helmut Newton.

The original version was never launched due to a mix of factors. Two calendars were commissioned in 1964, with the best one chosen for release. However, Newton was forced to stop shooting because of personal issues and his assistant took over the project, paying close attention to his boss’s instructions, but, in the end, competing photographer Robert Freeman landed the job.

Pirelli celebrates its 50th anniversary next year, and its 2014 edition has been hailed as a celebration of its success to date. Each calendar is known for starring scantily-clad supermodels posing in provocative positions, although the 2013 edition was photographed by Steve McCurry – who adopted a more demure approach to the proceedings – having famously taken the striking portrait of the green-eyed Afghan Girl for the cover of the National Geographic in 1985.

In August this year, Pirelli unveiled a commemorative shoot of some of fashion’s most famous models, including Miranda Kerr, Alessandra Ambrosio and Helena Christensen, which were thought to pre-empt its forthcoming calendar stars – although this wasn’t to be.

Sony World Photography Awards 2014

Posted By admin / March, 21, 2014 / 0 comments

From muddy smiles to mini ponies and a rodeo in France, here are the winners of the youth and open categories in the 2014 Sony World Photography Awards

source: Guardian UK

Casting Call Asia website has been launched!

Posted By admin / March, 7, 2014 / 0 comments

We are very excited to announce that Casting Call Asia is now fully online
Check our new website www.castingcallasia.com
You can register for free and benefit from the new launch of the platform.
This tool will allow you to build the profile you like, improve your visibility on the net, and have access to more castings.
Casting Call Asia – CCA has been built by professionals who are active in the media, photography, movie, modeling and entertainment industry.
The ultimate target is to facilitate the communication & cooperation among professionals working in the same industry.

It is very easy to register:
- Go on www.castingcallasia.com
- Then, go on the register box
- Fill in your user information and choose the profile that corresponds best to your characteristics
- When the registration is completed, you can start posting pictures and movies that describe best your profile.
- Have fun and start exchanging with other people involved in the same industry!

 

Casting-Call-Asia-Models-Photographers-Database-Community-Agency-South-East-Asia-1

Casting-Call-Asia-Models-Photographers-Database-Community-Agency-South-East-Asia-2

Models-Photographers-Database-Community-Directory-Thailand-Bangkok-2

John Stanmeyer wins World Press Photo 2014

Posted By admin / February, 17, 2014 / 0 comments

John Stanmeyer, a VII Photo member and National Geographic contributor, has won World Press Photo of the Year for an image of African migrants on the shore of Djibouti, “raising their phones in an attempt to capture an inexpensive signal from neighbouring Somalia”

world-press-photo-2014-winners-1

World Press Photo of the Year 2013: 26 February 2013, Djibouti City, Djibouti African migrants on the shore of Djibouti city at night, raising their phones in an attempt to capture an inexpensive signal from neighboring Somalia—a tenuous link to relatives abroad. Djibouti is a common stop-off point for migrants in transit from such countries as Somalia, Ethiopia and Eritrea, seeking a better life in Europe and the Middle East © John Stanmeyer, USA, VII for National Geographic

“It’s a photo that is connected to so many other stories – it opens up discussions about technology, globalisation, migration, poverty, desperation, alienation, humanity,” says Jillian Edelstein, jury member of this year’s World Press Photo. ”It’s a very sophisticated, powerfully nuanced image. It is so subtly done, so poetic, yet instilled with meaning, conveying issues of great gravity and concern in the world today.”

US photographer John Stanmeyer of VII Photo was on assignment with National Geographic when he shot this image of “African migrants on the shore of Djibouti city at night, raising their phones in an attempt to capture an inexpensive signal from neighbouring Somalia – a tenuous link to relatives abroad,” reads the caption. “Djibouti is a common stop-off for migrants in transit from countries such as Somalia, Ethiopia and Eritrea seeking a better life in Europe and the Middle East.” The picture also won 1st Prize in the Contemporary Issues category.

Speaking to BJP, Stanmeyer says: “It’s an honour and privilege to win. I hope it communicated the reality that we could be any one of those people on the beach, trying to talk to our families back home.”

The image was shot during the first part of a multi-year project for National Geographic on human migration in northern Africa. “I spent a month driving and walking through Ethiopia and ended up in Djibouti, and I remember talking with my writer Paul Salopek on the beach at the Red Sea where, ironically, 60,000 years ago there was a land bridge that allowed us to continue our path – to connect. Today, we have other means of connecting, using, for example, mobile phone signals. I was in Djibouti city, walking along the beach looking for things to photograph, and I remember coming across that spot and seeing all of these people here; I asked my translator what they were doing. They were engaged in what is called ‘catching’. They were trying to get a signal to talk to their loved ones at home. How can modern-day migration be more illustrated than this?”

Stanmeyer photographed at night in a bid to protect his subjects’ identity and privacy. “People are very skittish, they don’t want to be seen. Understandably. And I love photographing at night – it was a full moon that night.”

Stanmeyer didn’t expect to win the World Press Photo of the Year, which, he says, should also go to the entire team who worked with him on the story: “The writer, the photo editor I’ve worked with, the magazine that supports reportage storytelling. And it’s also for the people in the image. I’m glad that I’m able to communicate something that is universal to us all. I have been that man or that woman in that frame countless times as I tried to reach my family back home. I’m thankful and honoured that something poetic, that I hope screams loudly, is shared this way now.”

David Guttenfelder, a photographer with Associated Press and also a jury member, says: “The photo is like a message in a bottle, it is one that will last. People will bring their own life experiences to it as they stand in front of it.”

“What we’re looking for in the winning image is the same quality you would look for in a great film or in literature – the impression that it exists on more than one level, that it makes you think about things you haven’t thought about,” adds jury member Susan Linfield. “You begin to explore the layers, not only of what’s there but of what isn’t there. So many pictures of migrants show them as bedraggled and pathetic; this photo is not so much romantic as it is dignified.”

Sarah Leen, National Geographic’s director of photography, welcomes the win. “John Stanmeyer’s winning image was the lead photograph in National Geographic magazine’s December 2013 story ‘Out of Eden’. It is an image of beauty and magic and wonderfully mysterious,” she tells BJP. “It worked marvellously within our story but it also stands as an icon for the digital era we are living in. Today we seek connection and community with texts, tweets, images and emails. This photograph beautifully, and poignantly, speaks to that desire for connection thru a particular community of people separated from their families and loved one. It is a wonderful choice.”

Stanmeyer’s image was selected from among 98,671 images submitted by 5754 photographers from 132 countries. The jury was chaired by Gary Knight, also of VII Photo. He talks about the process: “Whenever anything comes on the screen, you are obliged to state to the jury that you have a potential conflict of interest. Every single time, you have to do the same thing. You repeat it over and over again. That was absolutely the case for me, and it was the case with many of the other jurors with photographs entered in this competition.”

He adds: “Also, David Campbell, the secretary, has written down all of our associations, and if he notices that there is a pattern in our advocacy or our voting that is consistent with the professional relationship we may have, we get called out on it.”

Winners

Other winners include: French photographer Philippe Lopez, who took first place in the Spot News (singles) category for his image of typhoon survivors in the Philippines; Goran Tomasevic from Serbia, who won first prize in the Spot News (stories) category for his image of rebels attacking a government checkpoint in Damascus, Syria; and Alessandro Penso from Italy, who won the General News (singles) category for his image of Syrian refugees. US photographer Sara Naomi Lewkowicz took first place in the Contemporary Issues (stories) category for her portrait of domestic violence; Markus Schreiber from Germany won first prize for his image Farewell Mandela, Pretoria, South Africa; and Julius Schrank, also from Germany, took first prize in the Daily Life (singles) category for his image of Kachin fighters in Burma.

world-press-photo-2014-winners-2world-press-photo-2014-winners-18

Last year, Swedish photographer Paul Hansen won the World Press Photo of the Year title for a picture of a group of men carrying the bodies of two dead children through a street in Gaza City. The picture proved controversial after Hansen was accused of manipulating and toning his image. The ensuing debate forced World Press Photo to change its rules regarding “the permissible levels in post-processing of image files” submitted.

BJP Editor Simon Bainbridge comments:

The more I see John Stanmeyer’s World Press Photo of the Year, the more I like it.

On first glance, seen without a caption, it looks like a rather cliched setup shot for a telecommunications advert, the silhouetted figures resembling sculptures – a naff reference to Mayans praying to their sun god, perhaps? – holding their mobile phones aloft in apparent reverence. But that works in favour of the picture when you learn that it is a reportage shot, and it highlights one of the most important stories of our times.

The figures are, in fact, African migrants, standing on the shoreline of Djibouti, the small republic wedged between the war-torn countries of Eritrea, Ethiopia and Somalia on one side, and the kleptocracy of Yemen, a short hop across the Gulf of Aden, on the other. They are holding their mobiles aloft in an attempt to catch a less-expensive phone signal from Somalia – maybe their only link to relatives abroad, or perhaps to contacts who will help them transit to Europe or the Middle East in search of better lives.

It is then a surprising picture, quite different from the images we are usually given to illustrate the wider story of migration out of Africa. It also hints at the role technology plays in this story, highlighting the fact that mobile phones, the internet and social media are bringing the so-called Undeveloped World closer to us in the West much quicker than the often arduous journey that migrants take to escape war or poverty – a reminder that our wealth and opportunity can no longer remain hidden.

see all pictures in the gallery

Source: BJP

Rig Anthony New Look Book Shoot in Bangkok

Posted By admin / January, 23, 2014 / 0 comments

The latest Rig Anthony Look Book was shoot by our team at Rig Anthony Look Book Shoot at Ocean Urban Lounge in Bangkok.
See backstage video:

and sample pictures:

The STORY OF GOSAIKUNDa FROM THE EYES OF THE KIDS FROM SYABRU BENSI

Posted By admin / January, 9, 2014 / 0 comments

by Martushka Fromeast, Nyima Tamang

“The main aim of my project is setting a clear goal and enabling a group of young people to accomplish something spectacular. I did not want 27 children in Syafrubesi, Nepal to become photographers, but I wanted them to get courage. I wanted to empower them and help tem to find a way to achieve whatever they want to achieve, regardless of their economic situation.”

In order to prepare ‘The Story of Gosaikunda from the Eyes of the Kids from Syafrubesi’, we created a set of photographs illustrating a local story, Chogar and Chona, shared with us by a local shaman. A group of 27 young people living in Syafrubesi village in Lamtang region of Nepal were supervised by myself and Nyima Tamang a local activist. The young people also received some training from Kishor Dangol and Priya Tamang, both from Kathmandu, Nepal.

Story-of-Gosaikunda-01 Story-of-Gosaikunda-20

I collected in Poland and UK second hand digital cameras from different people and took them to Nepal and taught young people how to use them. Afterwards, during carefully planned sessions, we divided the story and prepared professional storyboards. We worked towards the plan, carefully designing every picture. We shot knowingly and used a variety of photographic means, playing with narrative sequencing and visual language of photography itself, carefully choosing the natural light or mixing it with artificial light, using long and short exposures, fake perspectives and so on. As a result, we created 20 pictures to illustrate the story.

The Gosaikunda Lake is situated at 4380 meters above the sea level. The lake is considered to be holy by Buddhist, Shamans and Hindu believers. The set of pictures illustrate the local story explaining the creation of the Gosaikunda Lake:

‘There is an amazing place nearby. Many years ago there was a village between hills. In this village, there lived two sisters, eldest was Chona and youngest was Choga. Once they set off to the jungle to fetch grass for the cows. They got very tired as they worked really hard. When they saw a beautiful place they decided to take a little rest there. When they finally set on to home, Chogar saw next, an even more beautiful place. Oh, how much she wanted to reach there. She started to walk. Suddenly, Chogar and Chona were no more together. No one knew where was Chona, Chogar was searching her so hard. Few months passed and Chogar was still searching for her sister Chona. Chogar was so tired searching, no where being able to find her sister Chona. Finally, in one place, she just sat. Chogar was searching days and nights and anywhere she could find any information about her lost sister. She had in her heart the true love for her sister. This love changed her into a Goddess. When she finally found her sister she was very happy. But when they started to talk, it came out that Chona found a place she really wanted to stay and she did not wanted to live anymore with Choga. Choga got really angry as she was searching her sister for all this time. But Chona’s heart was black and she did not care for her sister’s feelings, she just left to live by her own. Chona’s egoism made all her body black. Chogar said to Chona: “You may stay by yourself, anyway I will be always around. One day you will see.” Since then Choga become a respected Godess and all the people celebrated her. When the sisters time passed, they changed into lakes. Since then, every year during Janai Purima holidays, we come to the Gosaikunda lake to celebrate Choga.’

To set a clear aim and enable the group of young people to accomplish something spectacular is what was most important. I did not want 27 children in Syafrubesi, Nepal to become photographers but I wanted them to become courageous. I wanted to empower them, disregarding their economic situation, to be able to find the way and achieve things they want to achieve.

The project was financially supported by Polish Institute in New Delhi, Social Welfare Foundation, Syafrubesi as well as via a Kickstarter campaign supported by a group of individuals. I want to thank my local collaborator Nyima Tamang for help in running the workshops. I was also supported by volunteers from Kathmandu: Kishor Dangol, Priya Tamang and Prakash Sijapati.

Legend as told by the local shaman ‘bompo’; from Shyabrubesi.
Pictures taken by children from Shyabrubesi and Martushka Fromeast
Story curated & edited by Martushka Fromeast
in collaboration with Nyima Tamang, Kishor Dangol & Priya Tamang

Official Project Page

 

Reuters releases its best photographs of the year 2013

Posted By admin / January, 7, 2014 / 0 comments

The most astonishing pictures of 2013 – Reuters releases its best photographs of the year.


Reuters-the-best-pictures-of 2013-7

Reuters-the-best-pictures-of 2013-1


See all at the Daily Mail website

 

 

The Protestors – Bangkok Protests on the 9th of Dec 2013

Posted By admin / December, 10, 2013 / 0 comments

Around 200,000 demonstrators rallied in Bangkok, with protest leaders saying their goal this Monday is to storm Shinawatra’s office, known as Government House.

Bangkok-Protest-December-9th-2013-11

During the weeks of demonstrations, protesters have occupied various government offices. The rallies have been mostly peaceful, but clashes between protesters and government supporters on November 30 left five people dead.

Protesters and police, who had confronted each other with tear gas and rocks in parts of Bangkok last week, agreed to a truce Tuesday in a show of respect for Thailand’s revered king, who celebrated his 86th birthday Thursday.

Protest leaders have said they want to rid Thailand of the influence of former Prime Minister Thaksin Shinawatra, the older brother of Yingluck.

Bangkok-Protest-December-9th-2013-01

Thai Prime Minister Yingluck Shinawatra dissolved the nation’s parliament Monday and called for new elections. But the move did little to appease anti-government protesters who remained on the streets by the thousands.

This is how the day looked like:

 

Tipayaphong Poosanaphong at Elle Fashion Week Bangkok 2013

Posted By admin / November, 4, 2013 / 0 comments

Elle-Fashion-Week-Bangkok-Tipayaphong-Poosanaphong-2013-October-38 Elle-Fashion-Week-Bangkok-Tipayaphong-Poosanaphong-2013-October-37

“This collection’s inspiration comes from the curved and geometric prints which appear on the pottery of Ban Chiang in the north eastern Thailand. The form of these potteries connects with silhouette in this collection. The colors scheme is not limited to to the colors that we used in the past but we also use black,gold, maroon and cream. In addition we also have embroidery made by hand and flower pattern that is our long-time signature.”

Source: Tipayaphong Poosanaphong Press Release

See all collection below:

Double Exposures of Two of the Most Photogenic Cities in the World, New York City and London

Posted By admin / October, 14, 2013 / 0 comments

Digital technology is such a good thing especially for those with extremely creative imaginations. London-based artist Daniella Zalcman realizes the concept behind her latest project, which is simply called New York + London: A Collection of Double Exposures. As the title declares, the collection is simply what it states.
From the Far Rockaway to the South Bronx in New York, or from Hammersmith all the way to White Chapel in London, the series merges iconic landmarks and imagery, turning into a series of amalgamated images of locations, haunts and skylines.

Originally inspired by the concept during her last month in New York City, Zalcman snapped over 100 smartphone photographs of the streets in NYC. With that start, she then used different smartphone apps to juxtapose her pictures of the Big Apple over images of London.

The composite results reveal striking similarities between two of the world’s most iconic cities. Zalcman’s work has been featured in The Wall Street Journal, Vanity Fair, and Sports Illustrated, and she is at present raising funds thru Kickstarter to fund a photo book of her work.

Zalcman recently spoke of New York + London: A Collection of Double Exposures,
“I was inspired by my move from New York City to London last year. I think it’s natural (and unavoidable) to constantly compare your old home and your new home when you move somewhere new (“London cab drivers actually know how to get around!” “The Tube closes at 12:30am?!”), and this is my way of visually capturing that instinct. These images are very much about architecture and urban infrastructure and I love comparing the two cities in that particular respect. London feels like such an old city rooted in visual tradition, where New York always feels like it’s trying to be as shiny and new as possible.”

double-exposures-new-york-london-5

double-exposures-new-york-london-4

double-exposures-new-york-london-3

double-exposures-new-york-london-2

double-exposures-new-york-london-1

Source: Double Exposure

 

World Press Photo to change contest rules following post-processing controversy

Posted By admin / October, 14, 2013 / 0 comments

World Press Photo, who has selected VII Photo co-founder Gary Knight as chair of its 2014 contest, has announced a change of rules regarding “the permissible levels in post-processing of image files” submitted following this year’s intense debate about manipulation in photojournalism

 

Earlier this year, World Press Photo was forced to re-evaluate the integrity of its winning image following false allegations of forgery leveraged against photographer Paul Hansen. While a panel of forensic analysts found that the image had not been digitally manipulated, it concluded that the image had gone through “a fair amount of post-production, in the sense that some areas [had] been made lighter and others darker,” wrote Eduard de Kam, a digital photography expert at the Dutch Institute for Digital Photography.

The allegations were at the centre of an intense debate about the increasing post-production practice in photojournalism, as discussed in a BJP article published last May.

Now, World Press Photo has confirmed that it will introduce new rules for its 2014 contest. “There has been a lot of discussion and widespread speculation regarding the permissible levels in post-processing of image files in the contest,” Michiel Munneke, World Press Photo’s managing director. “We have evaluated the contest rules and protocols and examined how to create more transparency, and we have changed the procedures for examining the files during the judging.”

He continues: “We will announce further details when the 2014 Photo Contest opens for entries later this year, but the bottom line is that we will need to be able to rely on the integrity and professionalism of the participating photographers.”

The contest will be calling for entries in December with a 15 January 2014 deadline. The winners will be selected by a jury chaired by VII Photo’s co-founder Gary Knight.

“The World Press Photo contest evolves every year as it seeks to adapt to the rapid changes in the media landscape,” says Knight in a press statement. “The very definition of what constitutes the press or what is a photograph has transformed since the Award was instituted. World Press Photo takes its role as the world’s most prestigious and multi-genre global photojournalism award very seriously and, as I look forward to chairing the jury again, there are new categories and a more diverse demographic of jurors to adapt to this changing topography.”

For more information, visit www.worldpressphoto.org.

Source: BJP

 

Aerial Photography of Poland’s Lakes Shot Across Four Seasons

Posted By admin / September, 24, 2013 / 0 comments

Photographer Kacper Kowalski’s aerial photos of Poland make for a flattering introduction to the country. Protruding into the southern Baltic sea, Pomerania in Poland is well-known for its great areas of forests that are scattered with lakes and winding rivers. The Kashubian Lake District is a land of enormous forests, rolling hills, untamed ravines speckled with giant boulders, colorful fields, picturesque villages, active rivers and hundreds of beautiful lakes.

During fall, the diverse forest sites turn into a sea of colors, with the leaves wilting at varying degrees while exposing the deep undergrowth as well as waterways. While airborne from para-gliders and geo-planes, Kacper Kowalski has been photographing this beautiful area from the air for years. His glorious pictures demonstrate nature’s exquisiteness as it transforms through a year.

Blog-Photography-Landscape-Lakes-4

Blog-Photography-Landscape-Lakes-3

Blog-Photography-Landscape-Lakes-2

Blog-Photography-Landscape-Lakes-1

Kitchen Portraits

Posted By admin / August, 7, 2013 / 0 comments

In commission of the City Archives and the The Amsterdam Fund for the Arts Erik Klein Wolterink has focused on the innards of the kitchens, as if the exterior didn’t matter.

The photographer opened cupboards, drawers, fridges and ovens. Each piece he photographed separately and reconstructed the images again to one unit. Like him, we zoom in on what the cupboards have collected over months or even decades. From instant mashed potatoes to truffle oil, from Maggi cubes to Ethiopian spice mixes. This is the raw material with which we must try to imagine who belongs to these kitchens.

A well-stocked kitchen refers to Turkish cookery with goat’s cheese and halal sausage. But the mix for homemade apple pie is a witness of an open attitude towards other customs. A mother shows her African roots with a plastic Voltic Sparkling Water bottle filled with palm oil. Female students undermine our prejudices with a spotless kitchen. In the kitchen of a family with growing children, a packet of Korma curry of Pakistani descent and cardamom pods try to square themselves with Dutch kitchen habits. Here the Dutch sandwich culture leaves its traces in the sandwich wrappers in the drawer, the sandwiches in the fridge and the Nutella chocolate paste in the sink cupboard next to the abrasive agent. The kitchen as metaphor of a complex, multicultural reality.

The book Kitchen Portraits is for sale in the City Bookshop.

Erik-Klein-Wolterink-Kitchen-Portraits-4

Erik-Klein-Wolterink-Kitchen-Portraits-3

Erik-Klein-Wolterink-Kitchen-Portraits-2

Erik-Klein-Wolterink-Kitchen-Portraits-1

see all the pictures here

source: Thisispaper.com

Italian photographers win top prizes in Royal Photographic Society competition

Posted By admin / July, 24, 2013 / 0 comments

Antonio Busiello (first picture below) won for his photograph which ‘raises valid and contemporary questions about body image.

Judge Anthony Holland Parkin said: “The Cullatore struck a chord with a number of the judges. In a world obsessed with retouched perfection, Antonio’s honest image of a man proudly displaying his huge calluses challenges the viewer, and raises valid and contemporary questions, about body image.”

Busiello was one of 1,285 photographers from 59 countries to enter the competition, of which 115 were selected for the exhibition.

Royal-Photographic-Society-competition-winners-2013-3

Royal-Photographic-Society-competition-winners-2013-4

Royal-Photographic-Society-competition-winners-2013-1

Royal-Photographic-Society-competition-winners-2013-2

Click here to see more photographs from the show

source: Independent UK

Why Do You Love Bangkok?

Posted By admin / July, 17, 2013 / 0 comments

BK Magazine has asked Bangkokians “What is it that you love so very dearly about your beautiful city?”
This is what they said:

Source: BK

Dogs dressed as their owners

Posted By admin / June, 27, 2013 / 0 comments

Do dogs really look like their owners? They do in this project by Swiss photographer Sebastian Magnani – he has spliced together portraits of the owners with their four-legged friends in a series called Underdogs

“I first started the project in August 2009. As soon as I had the idea, it had pretty much already been realized, namely to photograph dogs with their owners. What originally started out as entertainment, without expectation, without any pressure, was suddenly creating waves. The four-legged friends and their owners have since travelled the world. Various blogs, journals, and television shows have all reported on the bizarre image combinations of humans and animals. So where does this striking resemblance between dog and owner come from? Does the “underdog” really rank himself lower, even visually? It is undisputed that the canines not only stir emotions and interest, but also our inner most needs. Dogs are considered loyal, selfless, trustworthy, life saving, fun and proud companions in a world where these values are gradually disappearing. From the inexhaustible number of examples, lies the difficulty to find the gems, which captivate with uniqueness, brilliance and depth. Only to create a single moment of symbiosis – between man and beast – to be one.”

dogs-look-like-owners-3
dogs-look-like-owners-2
dogs-look-like-owners-1

See all pictures at The Guardian

 

 

Winners of the annual FCCT/OnAsia Photojournalism Contest

Posted By admin / April, 4, 2013 / 0 comments

The Foreign Correspondents’ Club of Thailand (FCCT) and OnAsia have unveiled the winners of the annual FCCT/OnAsia Photojournalism Contest. The competition was the largest in its six-year history, attracting submissions from more than 375 photographers, a record, and over 6,000 images. Judges selected winners in four categories: Spot News, Feature Photography, Migration (a special category sponsored by the Delegation of the European Union to Thailand) and Photo Essay. In addition, the judges selected a Photographer of the Year, the contest’s top prize.

See all pictures here

Winners-of-the-annual-FCCT-OnAsia-Photojournalism-Contest

Source: Bangkok Post

Swedish Photographer Paul Hansen wins World Press Photo of the Year 2012

Posted By admin / February, 24, 2013 / 0 comments

The international jury of the 56th annual World Press Photo Contest has selected a picture by Paul Hansen of the Swedish daily Dagens Nyheter as the World Press Photo of the Year 2012. The picture shows a group of men carrying the bodies of two dead children through a street in Gaza City. They are being taken to a mosque for the burial ceremony while their father’s body is carried behind on a stretcher. Two-year-old Suhaib Hijazi and his older brother Muhammad were killed when their house was destroyed by an Israeli missile strike. Their mother was put in intensive care. The picture was made on 20 November 2012 in Gaza City, Palestinian Territories.

The jury gave prizes in nine themed categories to 54 photographers of 33 nationalities from: Argentina, Australia, Belgium, Brazil, Canada, Chile, China, Czech Republic, Denmark, France, Germany, India, Indonesia, Iran, Italy, Jordan, Malaysia, Mexico, Palestinian Territories, the Netherlands, Peru, Poland, Portugal, Russia, Serbia, South Africa, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, Turkey, United Kingdom, USA, and Vietnam.

The members of the jury announced the winners at a press conference held at the World Press Photo office in Amsterdam on 15 February.

Comments on the winners by the jury
Mayu Mohanna, jury member from Peru, said of Paul Hansen’s winning picture: “The strength of the pictures lies in the way it contrasts the anger and sorrow of the adults with the innocence of the children. It’s a picture I will not forget.”

Santiago Lyon, vice president and director of photography at The Associated Press, spoke of the selection of prizewinners: “When I look at the results, as chair of the jury, I think that the World Press Photo of the Year, and all the other photos that were given prizes, were solid, stellar examples of first-rate photojournalism that is powerful, that is lasting, and that will reach whoever looks at them.”

The judging was conducted at the World Press Photo office in Amsterdam. All entries were anonymously presented to the jury, who discussed their merits over a two-week period. The jury operates independently and a secretary without voting rights safeguards the fairness of the procedure. The contest drew entries from professional press photographers, photojournalists and documentary photographers across the world. By the mid-January deadline, 103,481 images had been submitted by 5,666 photographers from 124 countries.

View all winners in the online gallery.

world-press-photo-winner-2013

Bangkok Post – My Bangkok Photo Contest

Posted By admin / February, 15, 2013 / 0 comments

By the February 18th you can submit pictures for the Bangkok Post “MY BANGKOK” Photo Contest.

T&C are available here.

Some of the submitted images you can see at Bangkok post Facebook albums:

album1

album2

Travel-Photography-Bangkok-Siam-BTS-Paragon-1

12