European Union Film Festival 2015

Posted By admin / June, 23, 2015 / 0 comments

European-Union-Film-Festival-Bangkok-Thailand-2015

European Union Film Festival 2015 returns to Thailand!
Join the crowd and watch European films from 10 July-9 August in Bangkok, Chiang Mai and Khon Kaen.

This year there will be 18 films shown (16 featured films and two short films) from 14 EU Member States! All films are screened in their original languages with Thai and English subtitles.

Admission to all screenings is 120THB/seat in Bangkok, 80THB/seat in Chiang Mai and free of charge in Khon Kaen.

Festival Programme

BANGKOK
10-19 July @ SF World Cinema, CentralWorld

CHIANG MAI
24 July-2 August @ SFX Cinema, MAYA Lifestyle Shopping Center

KHON KAEN
7-9 August @ SF Cinema City, Central Plaza Khon Kaen

How to buy/get tickets
Tickets can be purchased at the cinemas’ Box Offices or on-line at www.sfcinemacity.com from 29 June 2015 onwards for the festival in Bangkok (120THB/seat) and from 13 July onwards for the festival in Chiang Mai (80THB/seat). For Khon Kaen, free tickets will be available from 30 minutes before screening at the Festival booth in front of the cinema (first come first serve, maximum two tickets per person per screening).

For the list of films, synopses, trailers, screening programmes in three provinces, please see: http://on.fb.me/1MYT2Sz

For more information, see: www.facebook.com/EUinThailand and www.sfcinemacity.com or contact SF Call Centre 02 268 8888.

World Press Photo 2015 winners announced

Posted By admin / March, 5, 2015 / 0 comments

The jury of the 58th annual World Press Photo Contest has announced this year’s winners. In what is considered one of the most prestigious photojournalism honors, prizes were given to 42 photographers in eight categories.

“World Press Photo is more interesting than being just a competition. The winning image fosters debate not only within the photo community, about who we are and where we’re going and what we’re trying to say, but also in the larger community. ”
—Donald Weber, World Press Photo Juror

After sifting through almost 100,000 images submitted by nearly 6,000, this year’s jury was able to award prizes to 42 different photographers. The winner of the coveted “World Press Photo of the Year” went to the Danish photographer Mads Nissen for his image of a gay couple in Russia.

After a year in which gay rights made headlines around the world, Nissen’s image was the perfect reflection of the historic change being felt around the world. Although Russia continues to impose repressive policies on its LGBT community, there are signs of hope elsewhere in the world. In the words of juror Alessia Glaviano: “The photo has a message about love being an answer in the context of all that is going on in the world. It is about love as a global issue, in a way that transcends homosexuality. It sends out a strong message to the world, not just about homosexuality, but about equality, about gender, about being black or white, about all of the issues related to minorities.”

This year’s awards were also marked by an increased vigilance against image altering. After controversies in years past, the competition was vigilant to ensure that there were no content modifications in any of the images this year.

In the words of World Press Photo’s managing director Lars Boering: “It seems some photographers can’t resist the temptation to aesthetically enhance their images during post-processing either by removing small details to ‘clean up’ an image, or sometimes by excessive toning that constitutes a material change to the image. Both types of retouching clearly compromise the integrity of the image. Consequently, the jury rejected 20 percent of those entries that had reached the penultimate round of the contest and were therefore not considered for prizes.”

Thus, we can be assured that this year’s winners are not only of the highest quality but also the utmost integrity as well.

see all winning pictures here: http://www.worldpressphoto.org/awards/2015

Source: LensCulture

The BK Film Awards 2015

Posted By admin / February, 20, 2015 / 0 comments
The BK film  => what BK loved and hated about Thai cinema in 2014.

Best Film – Teacher’s Diary (Nithiwat Tharatorn)

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OK, the writing or acting in this GTH rom-com won’t blow any minds, but we think it’s just about the best Thai film we watched last year. The premise of a guy falling in love with a girl by reading her diary could easily become bloated and bogged down by melodrama, which makes it even more impressive that director Nithiwat Tharathorn (of Seasons Change, the film that cemented GTH’s position as the best Thai film company for many) was able to craft such a well-rounded story. The film has comedy and warm, fuzzy drama in just the right balance, making it a joy—and a breeze—to watch. The beautiful cinematography, which takes full advantage of one of Thailand’s best-preserved natural environments, also deserves praise.

Best Leading Actress -Toei Jarinporn (Timeline)

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The female lead in the sequel to 2004’s hit romance film The Letter, Toei is a veteran of Thailand’s film and TV industry, and she brings all that experience to the fore in portraying the lively and optimistic Mut. While Timeline’s script is average at best, Toei instills her character with life and vigor, stealing every scene she’s in. In fact, Toei’s performance is the best thing about the film, hands down.

Best Leading Actor – Ananda Everingham (Concrete Clouds)

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Ananda had a quiet 2013, possibly due to the backlash he received from the supremely disappointing 2012 film Shambala. His acting chops, however, have never been in doubt, and he was back to kick ass in 2014’s Concrete Clouds. He fits the role of a foreign exchange student reluctantly called home perfectly, and his body language and mannerisms are as excellent as ever. Expect to see Ananda in every single TV commercial and music video again.

Best Supporting Actress -Marsha Wattanapanich (Love on the Rocks)

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Marsha and her entourage of drinking friends are probably the only good thing about this illogical and poorly-thought out film. Her natural charisma and confident mannerisms make her character a joy to watch, even when everything else in the film makes not a lick of sense (let’s not even get started on the irrationality of the two lead characters). It’s a shame that her character only got such limited screen-time, and the second half of the film is infinitely less interesting without her.

Best Supporting Actor(s) – The kids in Teacher’s Diary (Nithiwat Tharatorn)

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It would be remiss not to mention all the kids who truly elevated this film from a run-of-the-mill love story into something more meaningful. The children also serve as another bridge between the two main characters, who supposedly never meet, giving them an important role in the overall story. The talent on display is also pretty impressive, with the kids pulling off comedic and dramatic scenes perfectly.

Best Documentary – The Master (Nawapol Thamronrattanarit)

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This year, the edgy director of indie gems like 36 and Mary is Happy, Mary is Happy graced us with The Master, a documentary telling the story of Van Video, a humble little store that sold bootleg foreign art-house films back in the 90s and early 00s. The whole movie is basically just a bunch of people talking, answering interview questions with the occasional piece of inserted footage, yet it impressively elicited both laughter and tears from us throughout its run time.

Best Director Mez Tharatorn (I Fine…Thank You… Love You)

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It was hardly a bumper year for Thai film, but the one production team you could rely on to deliver the laughs was GTH. As far as box office hits go, I Fine… Thank You… Love You had the second highest opening day for a Thai film ever—no laughing matter. As with his previous film, 2012’s low-budget smash ATM: Er Rak Error, Mez showed a knack for telling a relatable story coated in over-the-top slapstick comedy, this time centering on English lessons and the often-unintended hilarity that ensues. The story isn’t rocket science, but then we’re not all rocket scientists, are we?

see more at the BK website

Source: BK