Posted By admin / August, 20, 2015 / 0 comments


Atlanta based photographer and creative director Stephen McMennamy has a thing for juxtaposition. By merging unlikely combinations of his own images he creates surreal visual pairings, often playing with scale. He has coined these eye-catching pictures #ComboPhotos, and showcases them primarily through Instagram.

Hunger Magazine asked Stephen what initially inspired him…

“I guess the short answer would have to be boredom. I was just mulling through photos on my phone, specifically pictures of my daughter from her fourth birthday. There was a photo of her with a big smile on her face and another photo of a pink balloon. During that moment of boredom I took both photos into an app called PicFrame (a photo collage app) and just started to mess with what was there. I don’t think my intention was to merge the two, but that’s exactly what ended up happening.

The image of my daughter and the balloon definitely got me thinking in the combophoto direction, but my first concerted effort (that falls more in line with what I’m doing now), was of a banana and the empire state building. I just so happened to have those two things in front of me at the same time. I did the edit on the spot and it instantly got me wondering what else was out there that I could experiment with. But well before all that happened I had really become enamoured with Instagram. There’s an endless amount of creativity to be discovered on that app. I saw a lot of people expressing themselves in so many unique ways. I’ve always wanted a more pronounced voice when it comes to my own creativity and I feel like that app and this photo technique has given me the voice I’d been looking for.”

See more from Stephen on his Instagram account: @smcmennamy

Source: text: Hunnger Magazine, Pictures: Stephen McMennamy

European Union Film Festival 2015

Posted By admin / June, 23, 2015 / 0 comments


European Union Film Festival 2015 returns to Thailand!
Join the crowd and watch European films from 10 July-9 August in Bangkok, Chiang Mai and Khon Kaen.

This year there will be 18 films shown (16 featured films and two short films) from 14 EU Member States! All films are screened in their original languages with Thai and English subtitles.

Admission to all screenings is 120THB/seat in Bangkok, 80THB/seat in Chiang Mai and free of charge in Khon Kaen.

Festival Programme

10-19 July @ SF World Cinema, CentralWorld

24 July-2 August @ SFX Cinema, MAYA Lifestyle Shopping Center

7-9 August @ SF Cinema City, Central Plaza Khon Kaen

How to buy/get tickets
Tickets can be purchased at the cinemas’ Box Offices or on-line at from 29 June 2015 onwards for the festival in Bangkok (120THB/seat) and from 13 July onwards for the festival in Chiang Mai (80THB/seat). For Khon Kaen, free tickets will be available from 30 minutes before screening at the Festival booth in front of the cinema (first come first serve, maximum two tickets per person per screening).

For the list of films, synopses, trailers, screening programmes in three provinces, please see:

For more information, see: and or contact SF Call Centre 02 268 8888.

Reflections Of Their Younger Selves

Posted By admin / June, 11, 2015 / 0 comments

Photographer Tom Hussey used sets of two people aged 50 years apart to create a collection of haunting photos offering an eye-opening perspective through the eyes of the aged who suffer from Alzheimer’s disease shows their extraordinary lives like never before.

A long-retired firefighter catches sight of himself in a living room mirror but instead of seeing greyed hair and softer skin, the striking reflection of a strapping young man stares back. The image may be nothing new to the older man, but the sight isn’t one his wife seen seated behind him appears to see as well.

The photographs ran as an ad for an Alzheimer’s pharmaceutical patch – seen on many of the model’s arms – aiming to help those suffering from dementia, a disease that gradually strips its victims of its more recent memories. For some people, they eventually only remember the memories of their youth. Symptoms of dementia include loss of memory, mood changes, and problems with communication and reasoning. The progressive nature of dementia, such as Alzheimer’s Disease, means that the symptoms will gradually get worse.

It was a WWII vet who inspired Mr Hussey’s collection that later won him a gold Addy and ran in the 2010 Communication Arts Photography Annual.
‘He commented that he didn’t understand how he could be 80-years-old as he felt he was still a young man. He just didn’t feel it was possible he could be 80-years-old,’ Mr Hussey told the ASMP of the war veteran.
He later built a bathroom set and photographed the man gazing at himself in the mirror, as a 25-year-old version of himself smiled back.
We worked through the casting and location aspects of the ads helping to determine what profession the patient had been in their youth so we could portray that in the reflected image,’ he said of the photos’ creation. ‘This profession drove what room setting and propping needed to be created to complete the image.’

In result, a seamstress sees herself seated before a sewing machine. In another photo a welder holds his old mask while turning to see himself in his much younger years, the mask clipped securely around his head.

In some of the staged photos actual pictures of the models are seen tucked into the setting, showing them how they used to look, Mr Hussey said.

‘The images are all about history — remembering yourself in historical context. I think the history and memory aspects are very important to me and my interest in this helped make the campaign a success,’ Mr Hussey said.

Source: Daily Mail

An Amateur Street Photographer Taking China by Storm

Posted By admin / May, 29, 2015 / 0 comments

Three months ago, Tao Liu was just a water-meter reader in the Chinese city of Hefei

Early in October, in the third-tier Chinese city of Hefei in the province of Anhui, the young street photographer Tao Liu became an overnight sensation. His witty images, which poke fun at contemporary issues in China – from overindulging parents to commercialism and the boundless urban expansion – were first shown on Weibo, China’s Twitter-like social network, by Life Week magazine.

Within 24 hours, the post had been shared more than 40,000 times, attracting the attention of the Chinese Central Television network. A week later, Liu was a household name in China.

With an ever-growing photography market, fueled by the popularity of high-end digital SLRs, China doesn’t lack quality imagery. Yet, Liu’s images struck a chord when others didn’t. His work often comes across as humorous, but he tells TIME, his goal is to present his own take on the world, which, he says, is loosely defined and open for interpretation.

But Liu is not your conventional street photographer. Instead, the 32-year-old is a water-meter reader for the Hefei Water Supply Company. Every morning from 8.30 a.m., he rides his motorbike on the city’s roads and spends his day hunched over to record businesses’ water usage. Armed with a Fujifilm X100 camera, he lingers on the streets during lunch breaks and after work to satisfy his love for photography.

Liu joined the military after high school and spent two years working as a prison guard in Shanghai during his service. He doesn’t think of himself as particularly well educated, he tells TIME, but he’s always hoped for a career in the arts.

After his service, Liu first worked in a water plant in Hefei and later transferred to the state-owned water supply company, with the wish of getting a desk job. “When I was out meeting with friends, I didn’t feel good about my job as a water meter reader,” he says. “They are all office workers. People who sit in [offices] are dressed very clean and proper.”

Liu’s photography took off when he discovered the work of Japanese master Daido Moriyama. “I found him [to be] a very focused photographer,” he says, referring to Moriyama’s long-term work on the streets of Shinjuku, Tokyo. “I chose my camera based on what he uses.”

Liu taught himself photography, regularly driving several miles to a small bookstore to find magazines and photo books. He subscribed to an Internet proxy to by-pass his country’s online censorship rules so he could watch photographers’ talks on YouTube and post some of his own images on a Facebook group of Asian street photographers.

One day, he received feedback from a Taiwanese photographer who sent him what he calls both a polite and flattering message. “He called me Mr. Liu!” he says, feeling pride for his work. “Although I’m not in big cities like Beijing or Shanghai, I felt connected to the world through the photos I took of [Hefei].”

With his newfound fame, many expected Liu to switch careers to open a photo studio or to take on the offer of a full-time job from a local newspaper. But, he declined to do both. “China is getting very utilitarian, and I want to challenge that by calming down and focusing on one thing,” he says. “But now I definitely won’t choose to go work in an office, not even if they pay me more!”

See samples below and for more visit his facebook page


Unsettling Surrealist Photography

Posted By admin / April, 15, 2015 / 0 comments

Fran Carneros is a visual artist who chooses to express himself via the medium of photography. His website is awash with an abundance of surrealist series that are incredibly compelling to look at – from landscapes, to portraits, to street photography, these are certainly some of the most absurd images you have ever seen.

For Carneros, surrealism is a “form of communication” and speaking of his projects, he outlines his intentions:

“I intend to express ideas that grow in my mind through a closely related technique of collage, although I use digital media to perfect pictures.”

He goes on:

“With each of my photographs I intend to express absurd ideas and thoughts, but at the same time have the ability to make the audience think.”

Indeed, the following images will undoubtedly make you ‘think.’ Dive right into the creepiness and check them out!

Fran Carneros website:


Striking landscapes of Fuerteventura

Posted By admin / April, 11, 2015 / 0 comments

The Canary Islands are renowned for their dramatic scenery and volcanic Landscapes which have brought thousands of tourists to their shores. We had a chance to work there for e few days so here is a few striking landscapes from Fuerteventura Island.

World Press Photo 2015 winners announced

Posted By admin / March, 5, 2015 / 0 comments

The jury of the 58th annual World Press Photo Contest has announced this year’s winners. In what is considered one of the most prestigious photojournalism honors, prizes were given to 42 photographers in eight categories.

“World Press Photo is more interesting than being just a competition. The winning image fosters debate not only within the photo community, about who we are and where we’re going and what we’re trying to say, but also in the larger community. ”
—Donald Weber, World Press Photo Juror

After sifting through almost 100,000 images submitted by nearly 6,000, this year’s jury was able to award prizes to 42 different photographers. The winner of the coveted “World Press Photo of the Year” went to the Danish photographer Mads Nissen for his image of a gay couple in Russia.

After a year in which gay rights made headlines around the world, Nissen’s image was the perfect reflection of the historic change being felt around the world. Although Russia continues to impose repressive policies on its LGBT community, there are signs of hope elsewhere in the world. In the words of juror Alessia Glaviano: “The photo has a message about love being an answer in the context of all that is going on in the world. It is about love as a global issue, in a way that transcends homosexuality. It sends out a strong message to the world, not just about homosexuality, but about equality, about gender, about being black or white, about all of the issues related to minorities.”

This year’s awards were also marked by an increased vigilance against image altering. After controversies in years past, the competition was vigilant to ensure that there were no content modifications in any of the images this year.

In the words of World Press Photo’s managing director Lars Boering: “It seems some photographers can’t resist the temptation to aesthetically enhance their images during post-processing either by removing small details to ‘clean up’ an image, or sometimes by excessive toning that constitutes a material change to the image. Both types of retouching clearly compromise the integrity of the image. Consequently, the jury rejected 20 percent of those entries that had reached the penultimate round of the contest and were therefore not considered for prizes.”

Thus, we can be assured that this year’s winners are not only of the highest quality but also the utmost integrity as well.

see all winning pictures here:

Source: LensCulture

The BK Film Awards 2015

Posted By admin / February, 20, 2015 / 0 comments
The BK film  => what BK loved and hated about Thai cinema in 2014.

Best Film – Teacher’s Diary (Nithiwat Tharatorn)


OK, the writing or acting in this GTH rom-com won’t blow any minds, but we think it’s just about the best Thai film we watched last year. The premise of a guy falling in love with a girl by reading her diary could easily become bloated and bogged down by melodrama, which makes it even more impressive that director Nithiwat Tharathorn (of Seasons Change, the film that cemented GTH’s position as the best Thai film company for many) was able to craft such a well-rounded story. The film has comedy and warm, fuzzy drama in just the right balance, making it a joy—and a breeze—to watch. The beautiful cinematography, which takes full advantage of one of Thailand’s best-preserved natural environments, also deserves praise.

Best Leading Actress -Toei Jarinporn (Timeline)

The female lead in the sequel to 2004’s hit romance film The Letter, Toei is a veteran of Thailand’s film and TV industry, and she brings all that experience to the fore in portraying the lively and optimistic Mut. While Timeline’s script is average at best, Toei instills her character with life and vigor, stealing every scene she’s in. In fact, Toei’s performance is the best thing about the film, hands down.

Best Leading Actor – Ananda Everingham (Concrete Clouds)

Ananda had a quiet 2013, possibly due to the backlash he received from the supremely disappointing 2012 film Shambala. His acting chops, however, have never been in doubt, and he was back to kick ass in 2014’s Concrete Clouds. He fits the role of a foreign exchange student reluctantly called home perfectly, and his body language and mannerisms are as excellent as ever. Expect to see Ananda in every single TV commercial and music video again.

Best Supporting Actress -Marsha Wattanapanich (Love on the Rocks)

Marsha and her entourage of drinking friends are probably the only good thing about this illogical and poorly-thought out film. Her natural charisma and confident mannerisms make her character a joy to watch, even when everything else in the film makes not a lick of sense (let’s not even get started on the irrationality of the two lead characters). It’s a shame that her character only got such limited screen-time, and the second half of the film is infinitely less interesting without her.

Best Supporting Actor(s) – The kids in Teacher’s Diary (Nithiwat Tharatorn)

It would be remiss not to mention all the kids who truly elevated this film from a run-of-the-mill love story into something more meaningful. The children also serve as another bridge between the two main characters, who supposedly never meet, giving them an important role in the overall story. The talent on display is also pretty impressive, with the kids pulling off comedic and dramatic scenes perfectly.

Best Documentary – The Master (Nawapol Thamronrattanarit)

This year, the edgy director of indie gems like 36 and Mary is Happy, Mary is Happy graced us with The Master, a documentary telling the story of Van Video, a humble little store that sold bootleg foreign art-house films back in the 90s and early 00s. The whole movie is basically just a bunch of people talking, answering interview questions with the occasional piece of inserted footage, yet it impressively elicited both laughter and tears from us throughout its run time.

Best Director Mez Tharatorn (I Fine…Thank You… Love You)

It was hardly a bumper year for Thai film, but the one production team you could rely on to deliver the laughs was GTH. As far as box office hits go, I Fine… Thank You… Love You had the second highest opening day for a Thai film ever—no laughing matter. As with his previous film, 2012’s low-budget smash ATM: Er Rak Error, Mez showed a knack for telling a relatable story coated in over-the-top slapstick comedy, this time centering on English lessons and the often-unintended hilarity that ensues. The story isn’t rocket science, but then we’re not all rocket scientists, are we?

see more at the BK website

Source: BK

Overlooked Black Dogs Get Adopted With Beautiful Portraits

Posted By admin / January, 24, 2015 / 0 comments

Darker-colored pups, it’s said, have a hard time finding homes — in part because their adoption photos don’t always turn out so great.

Humane Society of Utah photographer Guinnevere Shuster is changing all that with a stunning new series of adoption pictures, centered around one very simple, laudable idea.

“People often comment on how black dogs do not photograph well, so I really wanted to show that they can,” Shuster says.

Shuster’s photos were inspired by New York City-based photographer Sophie Gamand’s work with pit bulls. Last year, Gamand took stunning photos of adoptable pits wearing elaborate flowered headdresses to help break down stereotypes and increase adoptions for the dogs, which are overrepresented at her local shelters and rescue groups.

“Here at the Humane Society, it was black dogs needing the extra spotlight,” says Shuster.

It’s worked. Since the pics first went up at the end of January, six of the eight dogs who modeled for the initial round of photographs have been adopted. That includes two 10-year-old Labrador retrievers who’d gotten no interest up until these photos, even though they’d been featured in the Utah Humane Society’s weekly TV spot.

“I would have expected two, maybe three, to have been adopted within that time without the photos,” says Shuster, who previously found success with photo booth-style adoption pics.

The pictures came out so well, and the results have been so striking, that a few other shelters and rescue groups have reached out to find out how they can highlight their black beauties’ best features. Shuster says it’s really easy — and cheap. She used a black backdrop, to best show off the dogs’ gorgeous eyes. Then she spent $22 on faux flowers to be hot-glued into paper crowns, picked up at a Dollar Store.

“Oh, I did raid one dried flower arrangement for the two lotus flowers and dried wheat grass,” says Shuster.

“When people see this series I hope they see how beautiful black shelter dogs are,” says Shuster, whose ultimate aim isn’t just to get her own rescue group’s dogs adopted, but to inspire folks from all over to bring home black dogs of their own. “Using photography to feature adoptable animals is a passion of mine and I’m always trying to come up with ideas to help those who need it most.”

Along those lines, Shuster’s already working up ideas for the next group of hard-to-place animals who need her — and her camera’s — special attention: cats.

“Last year during kitten season I just tried doing the studio shots without huge success,” she says, “so it will be interesting to see if doing a series will really help with them like it has the dogs.”


What three Norwegian fashionistas learned after a month in a Cambodian textile factory

Posted By admin / December, 20, 2014 / 0 comments

When Norway’s largest newspaper Aftenposten sent three young fashion bloggers to Phnom Penh to work for a month at a clothing factory, they came back transformed. One of the teens, a 17-year-old fashion blogger named Anniken Jørgensen, is now criticizing fast fashion chain H&M for not paying higher wages. She is also blasting Aftenposten for not showing more footage of the poor working conditions at the factory they visited. And the Asian garment industry is now under debate in the Norwegian parliament, according to the director of the series, which has been viewed more than 1.5 million times.

In the reality series, called “Sweatshop Deadly Fashion,” the teenagers initially display flippant curiosity. Early on, Jørgensen asked, referring to the workers, “How many do you think die each year?” Another participant ventured that workers must be “used to” their harsh lives. By the end, they were holding tear-filled one-on-one interviews with the workers and railing against the fashion companies that they themselves have frequented. Twenty-year-old participant Ludvig Hambro said at the end of the series: “The truth is that we are rich because they are poor. We are rich because it costs us €10 ($11.20) to buy a t-shirt at H&M.”

As Quartz has reported, Cambodia was once seen as a model for other textile producing countries, but worsening safety standards and flat wages prompted widespread protests last year. The government eventually raised the minimum wage from $80 a month to $128, but only after police shot and killed five workers. That wage is still lower than the $160 protesters had originally demanded. May Sopheaktra, president of the Cambodian Alliance of Trade Unions, told Voice of America that union members are still being fired from their jobs.

H&M said in a statement to Aftenposten in response to the show, “This program is not representative in relation to H&M’s social responsibility and the comments give a wrong picture of the work we do around the working and salary conditions at our contractors.” You can watch the entire series, subtitled in English, on Aftenposten’s website.

See all episodes in English here:




So you think your look is unique? – see Hans Eijkelboom’s street fashion photography

Posted By admin / November, 15, 2014 / 0 comments

You could never accuse Hans Eijkelboom of a lack of dedication. For his new book, People of the Twenty-First Century, the photographer and conceptual artist spent 20 years lurking around shopping centres – initially in his native Netherlands, later in America and China. Working almost daily, he would note similarities in the appearance of passers-by and surreptitiously photograph them, or take “photo notes” as he calls them.

“The process,” he says, “is simply that I walk to the centre of the city where many people are. Then I walk around for 10 to15 minutes. When something in the crowd intrigues me or touches me, I decide that will be the theme of the day. Then I start photographing for two hours. Many times, it goes wrong: I don’t see anything, so I don’t photograph that day; or I go to the city, see my subject, start photographing and, surprisingly, in the next two hours, never see my subject again. And then, for that day, there is no photo note.”

Eijkelboom’s previous works have included managing to insinuate himself into the background of every photograph that accompanied the main story in his local paper for 10 consecutive days; convincing wives whose husbands had gone to work to pose for a family photograph with Eijkelboom taking the place of the absent father; posing for self-portraits wearing entire outfits he’d bought for €10 or less. In those, the photographer was the star. With the photo notes, Eijkelboom effectively has to vanish.

“The camera is hanging on my body, with a wire that goes into my pocket,” he says. “That’s the way I make the photos. When you walk in the city and look through the viewfinder, people say, ‘What are you doing? Why this photograph?’ And so on. I don’t have time to talk about what I’m doing, I want to get it done in two hours. And when you make a photo in a normal way, you intervene in the situation: people will react to the camera, and will not be normal.”

Partly inspired by People of the Twentieth Century, August Sander’s mammoth attempt to document German society from 1911 until his death in 1964, Eijkelboom wants to create a kind of visual diary. “The work I did before was always about my own identity and identity in society. I always have the feeling I am more or less the product of the society I’m living in – and the photo notes are trying to visualise my surroundings.”
Furry hoods in Amsterdam. From Hans Eijkelboom’s People of the Twenty-First Century
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Furry hoods in Amsterdam, from People of the Twenty-First Century. Photograph: Hans Eijkelboom/Phaidon

The results, collated in a 500-page book, are simultaneously mundane and compelling. Laid out in a grid, the shots of women wearing pink T-shirts or businessmen carrying briefcases have a hypnotic, repetitious quality, but the longer you look at them, the more nuances become apparent. Eijkelboom used a similar technique in an earlier project, Paris-New York-Shanghai, an exhibition and a trio of books documenting everyday life in those cities that was widely perceived as being a deadpan comment on globalisation’s effect on national identity. The point seemed to be that people increasingly dressed the same all over the world.

People of the Twenty-First Century offers a more positive message. Eijkelboom occasionally documents a fashion trend, or a tribal allegiance, where people are trying to look alike: bikers, Rolling Stones fans wearing the band’s logo. But more often, the similarities between his subjects’ appearances reveal themselves to be superficial. Eijkelboom might have chanced upon a dozen people all wearing yellow T-shirts, but they’re not a uniform and their significance changes with each person: one shirt is pledging allegiance to a football team, another to a band, another to surfing.

“That’s a very strange development in society,” says Eijkelboom. “That wasn’t the intention at the start of the project, but in the end you could say the book is about a fight, a war within society: more and more, big companies have their grip on people, in producing the clothes and so on. But in the book you see the possibilities to give it your own personal touch. When you now go to the Kalverstraat in Amsterdam, everybody has their own individual message on their T-shirt. But on the other hand, they all look the same, because they are all people with a message on their T-shirt. You can already see a little bit of change, making the power of the big companies weaker, I think. To own clothing by a brand is less important than five years ago.”

He thinks this might have something to do with the rise of the internet, which the book inadvertently documents: its earliest photographs come from 1994, an era that was “a little bit more friendly, a little bit more naïve”, when the internet was more discussed than used, when a feature about it in Time magazine still had to open by explaining what the web was.

“My project is related to the city and the crowd in the city. When I look at younger people now, I see more and more that the web is their city. It’s more important now to have an identity on the web, which is very different from an identity shown through your clothes, and you can see that in the book. But I have so much trust in people that I think everybody will find a way to express themselves individually. But in what way? I really don’t know.”

Whatever happens, Eijkelboom intends to document it. He no longer goes out five days a week, but his days of lurking around shopping centres are far from over. “It is very important that I do it for as long as possible – because the very first photo notes I made are now the most interesting. Time is an important part of the project. I’m now 65. I hope I can do it for another 15 years.”

source: The Guardian

Very subjective list of best Thai movies ever

Posted By admin / October, 26, 2014 / 0 comments

So what would be your list of best Thai movies ever?
This is what we have come up with. This would be our subjective list of best Thai movies. Not in any particular order. Just a list ;-) Enjoy!

Jan Dara

(2001), IMDB rating 6.3/10

Jan Dara is a highly erotic-period-drama that will take your imagination to dangerous places. The film is co-directed and written by Nonzee Nimibutr. The movie is co-starred by the beautiful Hong-Kong Actress Christy Chung. The movie debuted in 2001 at the Toronto International Film Festival. It is based on a novel by Utsana Phloengtham. Jan Dara won Thailand National Film Association Award as well as a variety of local and international festivals.

Hello Stranger

(2010), IMDB rating 7.6/10

Just like thousands of Thai couples, during the 9 days holiday of Songkran festival, a guy and a girl choose to visit Korea for their own specific reasons. They did not start the trip to go together, but end up returning back home together.

Friends Never Die

(2012), IMDB rating 7.7/10

“Song” is a freshman at a college meets “Gun” – the founder and leader of “Sperm Gang” by a chance. Song later steps into a gangster life. Through violence, brawls and temper of teenagers, each members of the gang learn what “Friendship” truly means.

The Billionaire

(2011), IMDB rating 7.9/10

What are you doing at his age? Age 16, TOP gained 400,000 Baht monthly from playing online games. Age 17, He was willing to fail school and instead earned money from selling chestnuts for 2,000 baht. Age 18, His family went bankrupt and remained 40 million Baht in debt. Age 19, He released Tao Kae Noi seaweed to more than 3,000 branches at 7-Eleven. At this present, Top is a 26-year-old businessman, the owner of the bestselling seaweed in Thailand. He owns 85 percent of the market share which is equivalent to 800 million Baht a year, and has 2,000 employees in his company. The Billionaire will let you get to know Top Ittipat in details about how he turned himself from an online game addict whom always got disparaged by teachers, to a famous young billionaire. How did he raise himself up to this position? Surely, everyone desires to get rich, yet not everyone dares to succeed like him. Find the answers that have made Top become a billionaire, while you still can.

Bangkok Traffic Love Story

(2009), IMDB rating 7.3/10

An urban love story set in the center of Bangkok where thirty-year-old Mei Li struggling to find true love. When Mei Li accidentally meets a handsome BTS engineer whom she considers as the right man, she plans to make her first move. Though too many obstacles keep popping up, Mei Li will never give up.


(2008), IMDB rating 7/10

An autistic girl with powerful martial art skills looks to settle her ailing mother’s debts by seeking out the ruthless gangs that owe her family money.

The Protector

IMDB rating 7.1/10(2005)

A young fighter named Kham must go to Australia to retrieve his stolen elephant. With the help of a Thai-born Australian detective, Kham must take on all comers, including a gang led by an evil woman and her two deadly bodyguards.


(2003), IMDB rating 7.2/10

When the head of a statue sacred to a village is stolen, a young martial artist goes to the big city and finds himself taking on the underworld to retrieve it.

Last Life in the Universe

(2003), IMDB rating 7.7/10

The comedy, Drama and Action movie was released in the year 2003 and it has made it to the international theaters because of its interesting story line. The film is about suicidal, Obsessive Compulsive (OCD) Japanese who is pushed by life to lie low in Thailand together with a pot-smoking woman who is struggling with the loss of a sister she cannot live without. The movie has received several local and international awards and nominations catapulting it to the international arena.

Bangkok dangerous

(2000), IMDB rating 6.7/10

Bangkok Dangerous is an action, thriller and crime movie released in 2000. It is about a deaf and mute hitman with his able partner who are operating in the city of Bangkok. He develops friendship with his partner’s girlfriend who happens to be a strip dancer in a local club. He meets a nice and innocent girl who works in a pharmacy as he goes about his assassination business. As the story develops, he realizes that his actions hurt innocent people and he makes about turn to exert his revenge on former boss.

Photographer Recreates Famous Portraits With John Malkovich As His Model

Posted By admin / September, 25, 2014 / 0 comments

Renowned photographer Sandro Miller has worked together with legendary Hollywood A-Lister John Malkovich many times, but when Miller wanted to celebrate the photography greats that had inspired and guided him, he had to do something special. So he, with Malkovich as his dashing unisex model, recreated some of those influential photographers’ most important portraits in a photo series called “Malkovich, Malkovich, Malkovich: Homage to photographic masters.”

The series puts both Miller’s exceptional photography and Malkovich’s masterful acting talents front and center. Miller gets each amazing portrait’s lighting, mood and composition down perfectly, while Malkovich replicates the subject’s emotions and expressions so perfectly that the photos become nearly indistinguishable, regardless of the age or gender of the original subject. And it was all done without Photoshop!

More info: |

The man behind Shockvertising – Oliviero Toscani

Posted By admin / August, 19, 2014 / 0 comments

Did it integrate opposites, has it united differences under a common flag, did it break down barriers or has it sparked controversies? Be it the white girl with blonde curly hair and an African American girl embracing each other or an attempt to fight world hunger or pulsing hearts of three different races, United Colors of Benetton has defined a new era of fearless and provocative ads.

Italian art director and photographer Oliviero Toscani is credited with creating Benetton’s daring advertising campaigns. Breaking the age-old advertising tricks, Benetton has always pushed sensitive subjects and challenged realities.

By 1984, Toscani’s work started creating buzz with ‘All the Colors of the World’ campaign that focussed on young people of multicultural groups wearing the brand’s apparels. A political alignment with consumers rather than just talking about the style and colours has helped in creating a movement against various social taboos.

Showcasing the message of unity in 1991, the brand portrayed one figure from three different continents warmed by a single blanket. The ad looked like a family portrait and gave the message of spreading love between people of different races. In order to fight world hunger in 1997, the brand used one of the most astonishing images to depict how hunger can consume human body. The most controversial ad was the ‘Death Row’ campaign that aimed at drawing attention to the controversy around capital punishment in the US. Convicted criminals were used as models and the photos were stamped with the words ‘Sentenced to Death’ and ‘We, on Death Row’.

Right from bravely using HIV AIDS to the colourful mix of condoms and the Cold War campaign with a photo of two black children kissing and wrapped in different flags, the brand doesn’t shy away from sparking debates.

The iconic image of an umbilical cord still intact to a baby and featuring a real AIDS patient on his deathbed was an unusual sight in the advertising space. To some it appeared distasteful and insensitive but it generated awareness about the disease and number of infant deaths.

Raising the bar of controversies again, Benetton recently launched the ‘Unhate’ campaign featuring religious leaders, prime ministers, presidents kissing each other as an attempt to foster global love and creation of a new culture of tolerance.

The campaign also took the Lion Grand Prix in Press; however, Benetton had to withdraw the photograph featuring Pope Benedict XVI kissing a senior Egyptian imam. The campaign generated more than 500 million hits and was among the top trending topics on Twitter.

The ‘Unhate’ campaign was followed by the launch of ‘The unemployee of the year’ communication campaign, set up under the aegis of the UNHATE Foundation, that seeks to challenge clichés about youth non-employment and asserts a belief in the creativity of the world’s youth. The campaign aimed to support youth to become actors of change against indifference and stigma. Young non-employed people, between the ages of 18 and 30, were invited to submit outlines of projects to be supported and the 100 most deserving projects received support from the UNHATE Foundation to turn these projects into reality.

Oliviero Toscani is an Italian photographer, born in 1942, in Milan. He is the ingenious force behind some of the most successful brands and magazines of the world, such as Esprit, Chanel, Fiorucci, Benetton and more. He studied design and photography in Zurich from 1961 to 1965.

Many a times, eminent brands all around the world communicate controversial statements through their advertisements and promotional campaigns. Toscani is one such artist who makes it possible for these huge or elite companies to spread creativity yet taunt at some social, economic or political issue. Through his work, Oliviero Toscani has given insinuation to war, racism, capital punishment and religion.

What is unique about such advertisements by Oliviero Toscani and other creative photographers, is that there is no image of the product, yet things are made to be understood. In some advertisements, there is no hint about what is being sold. The same thing is presented in one of Toscani’s work for No.l.ita, an Italian apparel company.

According to Toscani, as much as it is important to promote a product or service, it is equally important for a company to demonstrate their social sensitivity and intelligence to a society. So, he began working using such issue as a reference and kept experimenting. The results suggested that this tactic became successful. Over the eighteen years of his work for Luciano Benetton, the company grew 20 times in size. Hence, whenever there is a possibility to use such creative angles, Oliviero Toscani is always up for it. For him, the most important part of an advertising campaign is the concept and the communication.

The only objective of art is to illustrate the conditions of humans through rationality and emotions. Toscani thinks that he inherited this great talent from his father, Fedele Toscani. Fedele was a photojournalist for Corriere della Sera, Italy’s well known daily newspaper. Thus, controversial photography is genetically transferred to him.

Fox India Hilton Hua Hin LookBook shoot

Posted By admin / July, 10, 2014 / 0 comments

The latest Fox India Look Book was shoot by our team at Hilton in Hua Hin.
See backstage video:

and sample pictures:

Henri Cartier-Bresson – Photographer who helped to establish photojournalism as an art form

Posted By admin / June, 13, 2014 / 0 comments

Henri Cartier-Bresson,  (born August 22, 1908, Chanteloup, France—died August 3, 2004, Céreste), French photographer whose humane, spontaneous photographs helped establish photojournalism as an art form. His theory that photography can capture the meaning beneath outward appearance in instants of extraordinary clarity is perhaps best expressed in his book Images à la sauvette (1952; The Decisive Moment).

Cartier-Bresson was born and attended school in a village not far from Paris. In 1927–28 he studied in Paris with André Lhote, an artist and critic associated with the Cubist movement. Lhote implanted in him a lifelong interest in painting, a crucial factor in the education of his vision. In 1929 Cartier-Bresson went to the University of Cambridge, where he studied literature and painting.

As a boy, Cartier-Bresson had been initiated into the mysteries of the simple “Brownie” snapshot camera. But his first serious concern with the medium occurred about 1930, after seeing the work of two major 20th-century photographers, Eugène Atget and Man Ray. Making use of a small allowance, he traveled in Africa in 1931, where he lived in the bush, recording his experiences with a miniature camera. There he contracted blackwater fever, necessitating his return to France. The portability of a small camera and the ease with which one could record instantaneous impressions must have struck a sympathetic chord, for in 1933 he purchased his first 35-mm Leica. The use of this type of camera was particularly relevant to Cartier-Bresson. It lent itself not only to spontaneity but to anonymity as well. So much did Cartier-Bresson wish to remain a silent, and even unseen, witness, that he covered the bright chromium parts of his camera with black tape to render it less visible, and he sometimes hid the camera under a handkerchief. The man was similarly reticent about his life and work.

In more than 40 years as a photographer, Cartier-Bresson wandered continually around the world. But there was nothing compulsive about his travels, and he explicitly expressed a desire to move slowly, to “live on proper terms” in each country, to take his time, so that he became totally immersed in the environment.

In 1937 Cartier-Bresson produced a documentary film, his first, on medical aid in the Spanish Civil War. The date also marked his first reportage photographs made for newspapers and magazines. His enthusiasm for filmmaking was further gratified when, from 1936 to 1939, he worked as an assistant to the film director Jean Renoir in the production of Une Partie de campagne (A Day in the Country) and La Règle du jeu (The Rules of the Game). As a photographer he felt indebted to the great films he saw as a youth. They taught him, he said, to choose precisely the expressive moment, the telling viewpoint. The importance he gave to sequential images in still photography may be attributed to his preoccupation with film.

In 1940, during World War II, Cartier-Bresson was taken prisoner by the Germans. He escaped in 1943 and the following year participated in a French underground photographic unit assigned to record the German occupation and retreat. In 1945 he made a film for the U.S. Office of War Information, Le Retour, which dealt with the return to France of released prisoners of war and deportees.

Though Cartier-Bresson’s photographs had been exhibited in 1933 in the prestigious Julien Levy Gallery in New York City, a more important tribute was paid to him in 1947, when a one-man exhibition was held in that city’s Museum of Modern Art. In that same year, Cartier-Bresson, in partnership with the U.S. photographer Robert Capa and others, founded the cooperative photo agency known as Magnum Photos. The organization offered periodicals global coverage by some of the most talented photojournalists of the time. Under the aegis of Magnum, Cartier-Bresson concentrated more than ever on reportage photography. The following three years found him in India, China, Indonesia, and Egypt. This material and more, taken in the 1950s in Europe, formed the subjects of several books published between 1952 and 1956. Such publications helped considerably to establish Cartier-Bresson’s reputation as a master of his craft. One of them, and perhaps the best known, Images à la sauvette, contains what is probably Cartier-Bresson’s most comprehensive and important statement on the meaning, technique, and utility of photography. The title refers to a central idea in his work—the decisive moment—the elusive instant when, with brilliant clarity, the appearance of the subject reveals in its essence the significance of the event of which it is a part, the most telling organization of forms. Later books include Cartier-Bresson’s France (1971), The Face of Asia (1972), and About Russia (1974).

He was singularly honoured by his own country in 1955, when a retrospective exhibition of 400 of his photographs was held at the Museum of Decorative Arts in Paris and was then displayed in Europe, the United States, and Japan before the photographs were finally deposited in the Bibliothèque Nationale (National Library) in Paris. In 1963 he photographed in Cuba; in 1963–64, in Mexico; and in 1965, in India. The French filmmaker Louis Malle recalled that, during the student revolt in Paris in May 1968, Cartier-Bresson appeared with his 35-mm camera and, despite the explosive activities, took photographs at the rate of only about four per hour.

In the late 1960s Cartier-Bresson began to concentrate on making motion pictures—including Impressions of California (1969) and Southern Exposures (1971). He believed that still photography and its use in pictorial magazines was, to a large extent, being superseded by television. On principle, he always avoided developing his own prints, convinced that the technical exigencies of photography were a harmful distraction. Similarly, he directed the shooting of films and did not wield the camera himself. With this medium, however, he was no longer able to work unobtrusively by himself. Cartier-Bresson devoted his later years to drawing.

His Leica—his notebook, as he called it—accompanied him wherever he went, and, consistent with his training as a painter, he always carried a small sketch pad. There was for Cartier-Bresson a kind of social implication in the camera. To his mind, photography provided a means, in an increasingly synthetic epoch, for preserving the real and humane world.

European Union Film Festival 2014

Posted By admin / May, 3, 2014 / 0 comments

รับบัตรชมภาพยนตร์ฟรีก่อนภาพยนตร์เรื่องนั้นๆเข้าฉาย 30 นาที ได้ที่โต๊ะกิจกรรมบริเวณหน้าโรงภาพยนตร์ที่จัดฉาย ถึงก่อนมีสิทธิ์ก่อน จำกัด 1 สิทธิ์ต่อ 2 ที่นั่ง ดูข้อมูลเพิ่มเติมได้ที่ หรือโทร SF Call Center 02-268-8888

Free tickets will be available from 30 minutes before screening at European Union Film Festival 2014 booth in front of cinemasat the three screening venues. First come first serve, maximum two tickets per person per screening. For more information, please visit


Songkran in Chiang Mai 2014 – Reportage

Posted By admin / April, 19, 2014 / 0 comments

Photographing Songkran in Thailand is a bit like underater photography  ;-) So here is the collection of 200 random images taken during Songkran in Chiang Mai. This is how far you can go with the cheapest DSLR wrapped in a plastic bag from 7-11


Portraits by Helmut Newton

Posted By admin / April, 2, 2014 / 0 comments

Looking back at old classics, we are presenting a collection of portraits by Helmut Newton

He led the ultimate glamorous life. He lived in the Chateau Marmont in the winter months, to keep the cold and gloom at bay, befriending Billy Wilder, Dennis Hopper and Robert Evans. He was married to fellow photographer Alice Springs, quirkily named after a pin was placed in a map.

Newton arrived in Paris in a white Porsche, was hired immediately by French Vogue, commissioned by Playboy, had a heart attack at 50, and lived in Monte Carlo. Then in a final fling – or what Karl Lagerfeld poetically described as “his last picture, taken by himself”, he crashed his Cadillac on Sunset Boulevard aged 83, on January 23 2004.

  • After taking a model onto the streets during an early assignment at British Vogue, he was sternly told by the editor that “ladies, Helmut, do not lean against lampposts”
  • All Newton’s exhibitions were curated by his devoted wife; all books edited by her, including: White Women (1976), Sleepless Nights (1978), Big Nudes (1978), World Without Men (1984) and the massive Sumo (1999), which came out at 31 inches, 26 kilos, £625, and with its own coffee table (Brad Pitt bought several copies)
  •   Celebrating 51 years of marriage in 1999, their joint exhibition and book, Us And Them, included Alice’s photo of Newton wearing nothing but black stockings and his strangely tender portrait of her lying on a hospital bed, following a major operation, wearing a catheter and a huge metal zip running up her stomach.


Pirelli’s 2014 – 50th Anniversary Calendar by Helmut Newton

Posted By admin / March, 22, 2014 / 0 comments

THE latest Pirelli calendar will not star fashion’s current crop of supermodels as expected, rather the Italian tyre company – which launched its first risqué edition in 1964 as an marketing tool – will release an unpublished 1986 calendar shot by Helmut Newton.

The original version was never launched due to a mix of factors. Two calendars were commissioned in 1964, with the best one chosen for release. However, Newton was forced to stop shooting because of personal issues and his assistant took over the project, paying close attention to his boss’s instructions, but, in the end, competing photographer Robert Freeman landed the job.

Pirelli celebrates its 50th anniversary next year, and its 2014 edition has been hailed as a celebration of its success to date. Each calendar is known for starring scantily-clad supermodels posing in provocative positions, although the 2013 edition was photographed by Steve McCurry – who adopted a more demure approach to the proceedings – having famously taken the striking portrait of the green-eyed Afghan Girl for the cover of the National Geographic in 1985.

In August this year, Pirelli unveiled a commemorative shoot of some of fashion’s most famous models, including Miranda Kerr, Alessandra Ambrosio and Helena Christensen, which were thought to pre-empt its forthcoming calendar stars – although this wasn’t to be.